Its KEY

WHAT MEN WANT

In Comedy, Communication, Griot, Movies, Networking, News, Video on February 15, 2019 at 12:22 pm


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Sometimes I sit and wonder to myself
how men think and operate within themselves.

I admit on the subject that I don’t commit to thinking too long,
and after seeing Taraji’s new film I need an Erykah Badu song

and a bag of that magical herbal tea
that she pushed on her patrons and Taraji P.

Erykah’s character also sold weed
in the back of a salon that installed weaves.

This film was easy going and fun to see.
In addition to my patronage, I brought an additional three

and we all enjoyed the theater haunt
that entertained us for 2-hours on WHAT MEN WANT.

So what do they want? You may ask.
Child, you’ll have to see the film to truly bask

in why women should not be privy to men’s passing thoughts.
None were too lewd; I’ve heard many through a faux cough

in my own life.
Though yesterday was about Tina Gordon‘s write

and co-written with Peter Hyuck and Alex Gregory too.
Taraji P. and 8 others executed the films produce.

Taraji was like Paula Patton in the way that she walked the project through.
No shade to Proud Mary, but the WHAT MEN WANT film had more juice.

Okay – the last say may contain a wee bit of shade for Proud Mary. 
It’s just that the project was strong but its final cut was miscarried.

WHAT MEN WANT
delivered on many fronts:

The storyline was good and the situations were fresh.
Did the composition and cast yield a comedic gas? Yes!

I laughed out loud often as did my plus-3 party of friends.
We laughed and nudged in the dark from beginning to end.

aldis-hodge_b-e-t.jpgEspecially at what some of the men were thinking – I’ll divvy no spoilers here.
But I will say that Taraji’s co-star Aldis Hodge is a talent our audience held dear.

I heard a few gasps when he came onto the screen.
I remember Aldis as Noah from the UNDERGROUND scene.

My, my, my, it was good to see him cast in a single father’s role
and the chemistry between him and Taraji P was relative gold.

Yes. I really liked it. erykah-badu_what-men-want.JPG
Again big ups to SISTER, the weed selling psychic.

Big ups to Tracy Morgan  who played the dad that held it down
when it was time for his son to be NBA draft-bound.
He was the no-nonsense Dad who’s prone to clown.

I saw a little bit of a Levar Ball ingredient as his storyline did unfold.
Tracy’s character had merchandise to promote his son, including a trademarked logo.

Tracy held his weight and added cohesiveness to the script.
Every element of this film was well placed – none shot from the hip.

I’m sure I laughed through a few quips; this film is a winner and at the conclusion, I felt refreshed.
I’m Qui
and it was good to see Taraji P. Henson continue to shine and look her best.

I say as much because – we all know her as Cookie from Empire.
Empire is no comedy, therefore Taraji’s talent is just fire.

Black History is Our Legacy

In Communication, Griot, News, Self Improvement on February 13, 2019 at 9:22 am

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February is one of my favorite months
because it represents love so very much.

While it’s a giving month it’s not too long.
What it lacks on long it makes up for in strong.

Like black coffee, this month and I are strong.
I like to make my points quick and not take too long.

Expresso?
I suppose so.

I like life strong.
In such a short month my mentions go long:

Don’t sleep on MASTER P and his NO LIMIT legacy.
Since 1989 he’s been on shine for the world to see.
His dimensions have depth,
Peep his journey; peep his steps:

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CLICK HERE

Percy is always a favorite subject of mine.
I like my men like my coffee; fresh in grind.

I am mindful that there would be no Master P if first he were not birthed a baby,
so I have to yield Black History Props to the all-encompassing Black lady.

Good morning, good morning:

Key-blk-women

Good morning to you.
Qui is indeed Black History, too.

Big props to your mom, your auntie, that Black woman at your job.
It’s okay if you LOVE ON US all-at-once; we can handle the mob.

I am a BLACK WOMAN and I love every stitch of my fabric.
I love Adam’s seed who confesses that he’s a femme addict.

Come with it – WE give it.
LOVE.

beating-heart

Education is a great foundation on which to stand,
please tell me that you still kick it with Dr. Umar, man?

An educated community has always been his goal and plan:

As far as my personal diet goes – I’m trying again. 😛

There’s an interest to pay homage to Black folks who are willing to evolve.
A fixed mind suits little, let an open mind be our collective find and resolve.

The task is not small and I see honing in progress.
To what the world is trying to hurl… I retreat and digress.

To remove thyself from the rigmarole – is always best.
Remain positively focused and you’ll pass this test.

howard-univ-black-women-peace-protest

Today.

Black History is good to me; truth it’s always yielding me,
I’m Qui
about Black History and Our Legacy.
THANKS for vibing with me.

The Harlem Renaissance

In Communication, Griot, News, Self Improvement on February 12, 2019 at 6:41 am

Harlem Renaissance Players

“…Our problem is to conceive, develop, establish an art era. Not white art painting black…let’s bare our arms and plunge them deep through laughter, through pain, through sorrow, through hope, through disappointment, into the very depths of the souls of our people and drag forth material crude, rough, neglected. Then let’s sing it, dance it, write it, paint it. Let’s do the impossible. Let’s create something transcendentally material, mystically objective. Earthy. Spiritually earthy. Dynamic.”Aaron Douglas

The Harlem Renaissance was originally called the New Negro Movement – a literary and intellectual era that birthed a new black cultural identity in the 1920s and 1930s.

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Alain Locke

Critic and teacher Alain Locke (a meticulous Virgo) described it as a “spiritual coming of age” in which the black community was able to seize upon its “first chances for group expression and self-determination.” Racism was rampant and economic opportunities were scarce therefore creative expression was one of the few avenues available to African Americans. The Renaissance was primarily literary while the birth of jazz is generally considered a separate movement—the Harlem Renaissance, according to Locke, transformed “social disillusionment to race pride.”

W. E. B. Du Bois (the encouraging Leo) was a Black historian, sociologist, and Harvard scholar. He was at the forefront of the civil rights movement at this time. In collaboration with a group of prominent African-American political activists and white civil rights workers in 1905, Du Bois met in New York to discuss the challenges facing the black community. Four years later the group founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), to promote civil rights and fight African-American disenfranchisement.

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Charles S. Johnson

Black-owned magazines and newspapers flourished, freeing African Americans from the constricting influences of mainstream white society. Charles S. Johnson (a literary Leo – like myself) owned Opportunity magazine which became the leading voice of black culture, and the leading publisher of W.E.B. DuBois’s journal, The Crisis.

Jessie-Redman-Fauset_Harlem-RenaissanceWith Jessie Redmon Fauset (a steady Taurus) as its literary editor, she launched the literary careers of such writers as Arna Bontemps (the Libra perfectionist) , Langston Hughes (the hospitable Aquarius), and Countee Cullen (the “me first” Aries).

Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey began his (Leo courageous) promotion of the “Back to Africa movement.” Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL), which advocated the reuniting of all people of African ancestry into one community with one absolute government. The movement not only encouraged African-Americans to come together but to also feel pride in their heritage and race. Marcus was known to hold ‘unity’ meetings in Harlem from time to time – including at the current residence of Fab5Freddy ( the analytical Virgo). It’s good to know that the future of our history remains positively in progress.

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Claude McKay

A (Virgoan) poet/novelist Claude McKay is published in the magazine Survey Graphics as a literary reflection of the movement in Harlem, along with Jean Toomer (the ambitious [ethnic mixed] writer and philosopher Capricorn) and the (charismatic Gemini) painting artist Aaron Douglas. Survey Graphics was edited by black philosopher Alain Locke, the magazine featured a plethora of works by prominent black writers of the time period.

James Weldon Johnson was a (Gemini) poet, editor, and civil rights leader, who wrote about Harlem during the 1920s in his autobiography, Along This Way (1933). He described it as the era “when Harlem was made known as the scene of laughter, singing, dancing, and primitive passions, and as the center of the new

James-Weldon-Johnson_Harlem-Renaissance

James Weldon Johnson

Negro literature and art; the era in which it gained its place in the list of famous sections of great cities”. The Making of Harlem, is an article written by James Weldon Johnson, which was published in The Survey Graphic Harlem Number (March 1925) – the article has since ’gone global’.

Zora Neale Hurston (the literal & profound Capricorn) contributed four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays to the credit of the era. She is best known for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”. In a letter to Countee Cullen, Zora wrote:

“I have the nerve to walk my own way, however hard, in my search for reality, rather than climb upon the rattling wagon of wishful illusions.”

I agree with Zora as well as all of the artists that were involved in the movement & had great plans for the future. They thought that they could change the world and prevent racial prejudice with their literature and art, and this cultural conviction was taken more than less seriously. Even though we can look back now and see that their hopes were highly optimistic, it doesn’t change the fact that some of the best known African American Authors came from this period. Many wrote in Harlemese; meaning they wrote as they spoke – broken English and all. Zora Neale Hurston was one of the many authors during the Harlem Renaissance that wrote and spoke the lingo. Zora was a southern woman, born in the South but birthed in Harlem….again, much like myself.

The Harlem Renaissance era started this literal revolution that I stand on today. The Negro Movement has evolved over the last 90 years. I can truly say — what our ancestors put in place less than a century ago is still serving us today.

Literal, Black & Creatively Expressing,
I’m Qui (a word witty Leo she)
The Harlem Renaissance era is my current blessing.

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