Its KEY

BLACK TV Sitcom Stuff Pt.2

In News on May 30, 2011 at 2:19 pm

Entertainment Weekly pressed a great read
that Qui Entertainment couldn’t refuse to transcribe & feed::

“The Rise & Fall and Rise Again of Black TV”

Entertainment Weekly — Part 2. Let’s Stay Together debuted in January to 4.4 million viewers, and Perry’s shows consistently hover near the 3 million mark. Even the competition has taken notice of The Game’s blockbuster debut: “Those numbers were wildly impressive to everybody,” says Michael Wright, TBS’ head of programming. “We’ve done really, really well with Tyler’s shows, but [The Game] surpassed even Tyler’s ratings. That premiere number should’ve made everyone think, “that’s a rating anyone would be happy to have.'”

So far, the broadcast networks have yet to act on the trend. While ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and The CW have made progress the past few seasons when it comes to casting diverse ensembles, the selection of shows in the pipeline for this fall once again lacks series with predominantly African American (or Latino or Asian) casts. “The world on television should look like the world I see when I walk outside my door,” says Grey’s Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes, developing of the fall season’s strongest contenders with a black lead, ABC’s Damage Control starring Kerry Washington as PR guru. And Queen Latifah, who starred for five seasons on Fox’s Living Single, sees African-American series as a way to represent a point of view sorely missing on television: “People live in bubbles and they perpetuate racism and classism. There’s still plenty of places they can go [on TV] that are as un-diverse as they could possibly be,” says the Ladies producer. “It’s just something that’s going to be a continuing fight, to try to keep making these things happen.”

Regardless of why the networks program for black audiences, viewers are clearly hungry for these shows: Not only are the few shoes doing well, reruns of long-cancelled series like My Wife and Kids and Everybody Hates Chris still top cable charts among African-American viewers. Says Charlie Jordan Brookins, senior vice president of programming for BET: “We’re not necessarily trying to say this is the new frontier. We'[re trying to super-serve an audience who has been underserved.” Adds Malcolm-Jamal Warner, “The black viewership is important. Black shows do make money. It seems like a no brainer.

[Entertainment Weekly Columnist: Jennifer Armstrong; Additional reporting by Archana Ram and Tim Stack]

How do you feel about BLACK TV?
I rather dig
those multi-ethnic gigs
that are reflective of you and me.

Who am I,
I am Qui
and I’m duly watching BLACK TV.
Oui! Oui!
Join Me.

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  1. All right, since you asked so nicely!

  2. […] concludes Part 1. — and wouldn’t you know, you don’t want to miss the conclusion — because it’s good to go… LikeBe the first to like this post.▶ No […]

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