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Posts Tagged ‘Queen Latifah’

Pat & Turn’er have nothing on Paula Patton

In Communication, Griot, Movies, News, Video on December 28, 2018 at 2:22 am

pat-n-turner_gif
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Talk about ‘walking a project through
Paula Patton is one of three Producers of TRAFFIK‘s truths.

Have you seen this relatively new 2018 film release?
I saw it on hump day and it is a beast!

It’s a Suspense/Horror piece based off of an ongoing, true scene.
It stars Paula and Omar Epps regarding a human trafficking ring.

Cali is the place where this story unfolded, resembling a romantic one,
but then certain hell rode in via Harleys & gin and killed all of the fun.

John and Brea were joined by Darrin and Mila for an impromptu date…
You’ve got to see what happened to Paula and the other three as the night grew late.

To add to my horror is the realization that this is happening in the United States.
Deon Taylor, the Writer/Director was inspired by headlines to create this screenplay.

traffik_paula-patton_omar-eppsDeon and his wife Roxanne are the other two producers of Traffik.
The film was budgeted at $4million and made $9Mil. That’s a reel hit!

Yes ma’am and yes sir! That is it!
Education and entertainment via a cinematic vent.

Please do not take my word for it – peep Paula’s Traffik
It’s riddled with edgy moments and eerie plot twists.

The title of this piece starts out introducing Pat & Turner.
If you aren’t familiar with the phrase, the aforementioned parallel will be a burner.

Pat & Turner are also known as your feet: ol’ right and ol’ left.
Paula did magnificent acting and producer-work on this tale.

With the statistics of human trafficking, I was impaled.
More than 60% are African American. We’re still for sale?

What the hell and why? If you’re stunned, then you are just like me.
Though the film laid out quite simply that it’s a million dollar industry.

This film kind of reminds me of GET OUT in the way that I was hanging on the edge – and for so long.
I recommend that you see Traffik with family and friends; its message and view is quite strong.

Pat & Turner are known for taking you from point A to point B
and Paula Patton not only walked this project through but she even acted in the piece.

Allow me to enjoy this sweet release. John Singleton and Ice Cube do it all of the time.
I just love when I get the opportunity to write about women of the same stock who are on their grind.

Women like Oprah and Queen Latifah, like Jada Pinkett-Smith and Vivica Fox.
That’s right! I’m doling out specific mentions because Black Girls Rock!

We can Write/Produce/Direct/Act, Pop & Lock! Now you know,
I’m Qui
Patting Turn’er and hoping you don’t overlook this film as a burner. Traffik is a dual show.

Entertaining + Educational

The most efficient way to go.

Out of the darkness

In Communication, Griot, Movies, Music, Networking, Self Improvement, TV Shows on September 7, 2015 at 5:58 am

Queen-Latifah…and into the light,
it appears QUEEN LATIFAH has been out of sight

but that’s how things look when you’re film producing –
you spend a lot of time behind the scenes leverage juicing.

So last week I wrote a little piece on that grunting Master P
just to log onto Facebook and find him posting about the Queen.

She has signed onto another reel deal and soon she’ll be in front of the cam
playing the role of young Master P’s mother in an upcoming film: The Ice Cream Man.

Remember that jam? I just linked it – here, last week.
Though today is about Queen Latifah and her journey of many peaks.

She’s always been a bit classy and not to be associated with the messy.
The Queen showed up and rocked the scene via reviews on the show BESSIE:

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I hear she went all out. I hear the production went hard.
I heard the choice critics loved it & it’s been nominated for awards:

Bessie-the-movie

Well good Lord, that’s why we haven’t heard from the Queen – she’s about her larkness.
She’s so busy singing and acting it only appeared she was consumed by the darkness,

the fade-to-black scene that a lot of black actors vanish into.
I’m excited to report Queen Latifah did not resort and keeps a project or two.

If you’re like me and you miss the Queen Latifah show
take comfort in knowing she’s not in the dark – yo!

She’s all up in the light, on her mark and ready for the next scene,
I’m Qui
lighting up the dark with productive sparks and this one’s about the Queen.

All hail her bright and universal appeal
on music, tv series, show hosting and film.
Queen Latifah’s the real deal.

filmstrip-dividerfilmstrip-divider

TBS-talent-house-of-payneSome just talk whilst others are ‘doing the damn thang,’
He’s all work and no chat —  he’s Mr. ALLEN PAYNE.

Tyler has claimed Allens talent and the two are actively engaged in a successful series flirt.
The HOUSE OF PAYNE lives in the TBS lane – it is classic Perry work.

Looking at Allen has never hurt.  My eyes are happy to see him when he works.
He’s been acting since the 80’s and dazzling the ladies; he’s quite the visual flirt.

His resume has been the -ish since 1989.
He has aged very little and my God he’s fine.

Did I already mention that? Pardon my stutter,
but anytime he’s on the scene, I’m glad to see this brother.

I love his network loyalty, but of diversity I am inclined to pull.
Besides I’d love to see Allen Payne on the set of Shonda Rhime’s SCANDAL.

I bet he’d be good. I remember his performance in New Jack City.
The people demand to see you more – Mr.Payne please take  pity.

Allen is anything but lost in the darkness, perhaps multiple roles are not his plight.
I’m Qui
just asking the good-looking he, if his future plans include more diverse script writes?

I’m obviously inquiring because I think his craft is out of sight
and, well… like I said, he’s so darn easy on the eyes.

Anywho, I figured if I spent the day on topic Out of the darkness,
it would be good to add this brother to the 411 list.

Todays: Reel Shop Talk

In Communication, Griot, Movies, Music, Networking on April 2, 2013 at 10:26 am

conversation-is-qui

I love movies. I love writing them, shooting them, editing them and most of all, I absolutely love watching them. My favorite film writers vary between a colorful, intellectual and goofy array of genres and styles.

HORROR films? I absolutely dig them. I’m a fan of the ol’ Wes Craven – big time. I grew up on Elm Street, but that takes no love away from my appreciation of Sam Raimi’s EVIL DEAD or Stephen Kings CARRIE or William Peter Blatty THE EXORCIST [1973]. I even have love for Alfred Hitchcocks THE BIRDS. I mean there are so many horror films I didn’t list that (to you) may be way more horrific and even stellar in genre — and I likely would not disagree with you. I like variety. Listening to your short list, I could  mess around and learn something new. I like learning – so I’m wide open.

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You have to appreciate differences.
Differences of genre, style, technique, writing and vision are key.
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I like Tyler Perry. I’m a relatively new fan of his. I was no fan of the Madea series at all. I was fortunate to see Mr. Perry live and on stage in Dallas, TX before his rise to television and film and the style wasn’t for my taste. I respected his right, but cared not for his staged writes. Naturally our “first introduction” led me to not be in a rush to see his films or other play works. Though after reading article after article on the attack of Mr. Perry’s writes, his style and even his ‘bafoonery’ and mockery of quality black film entertainment, I began to reconsider. Even with my own theatrical reservations – I strongly disagreed that Mr. Perry should be condemned for his vision, his style or his genre choices, after all, so many others are entertained by him. I respect that. We all should.

In the name of respect and second chances, I set out to be reintroduced to Tyler Perrys work at WHY DID I GET MARRIED 2, (and no – I did not see WHY DID I GET MARRIED prior to seeing part 2 because I still wasn’t in the mood). Why did I get married 2 was not a brilliant film, but it was a relative film. Black culture was Tyler’ly tailored and oozing in every scene. It felt like I was watching family. Some dignified, some degreed, some lacking and in need, some funny and on the go and others living life like ‘I don’t know.’  They were all right there. So at the conclusion of the film, there was no standing applause, or a sitting one for that matter but there was a lot of comfortable  laughing in the dark throughout the broadcast. I left the theater satisfied. It was as if I paid $8 to hang out with a few relative folk and had a good time. Tyler mixed a whole bunch of drama, a little suspense and easy going pockets of comedy into Why Did I Get Married 2 that the cast was able to convey. Speaking of cast, I do believe Tyler Perry is considered to be a major employer when it comes to hiring black actors. 🙂 Another reason why this brother gets my vote. SUPPORT is crucial.

Ice Cube isn’t Tyler Perry and Tyler Perry isn’t Spike Lee.
John Singleton isn’t Shonda Rhimesshe’s all over the TV.

American Pie is a jewish dish and God knows I love Matzo!
Film variety should be accepted as easily as diversely shaped pasta.

It’s all made the same way & entertainment flavors the pallet.
If it’s good, we eat more – if not we yield Ghallagers mallet.

Big ups to Queen Latifah for her reel underground efforts in broad day light.
Queen Latifah not only raps and sings, but she film produces, directs and writes.

I love movies, I love people – I thank God for the field that I am in.
I’m Qui
Kicking Reel Shop Talk with thee – DIVERSITY is my topic of spin

Still Jill

In Communication, Griot, Music, Networking, News on November 7, 2012 at 2:03 pm

“It really is up to us,” Jill Scott says, “to stop and smell our own damn flowers.” The singer is jet-lagged, y’all. It’s been less than a week since she returned to the States from her European tour, where she made headlines in London simply by rocking a freshly cropped, red-tinted, teen-weeny ‘fro. Now Jilly from Philly is finally back home in L.A., where she’s lived for the last few years. At the moment, she’s tidying up and trying to figure out how she can take a relaxing bath before her son, 3-year old Jett, returns home after staying with family members while she was away.

The conversation shifts to women and empowerment. Says Scott, “I look at us in amazement and think to myself, ‘You are not just your job or your size or your interests or your man o ryour children. You are a bountiful bouquet.” This comes straight from the 40-year old, who celebrated the milestone birthday in April on the set of her latest TV movie, Steel Magnolias. “I owe myself a party,” she says, laughing and remembering the moment. “Something happened. It was like somebody clicked on a light.”

With a NEW MOVIE, and A NEW ATTITUDE
our FAVORITE SISTA FRIEND is…
Still Jill

When Scott’s eyes adjusted to the shine, she saw a few things rather clearly: herself as a single mother “raising a little Black boy in America”; a new start in North Hollywood; and a businesswoman with her own label, Blues Babe Records, complete with a Warner Bros. Record distributing deal.

“I just felt it was time to grow,” the singer says of Blues Babe, inspired by a painful split with former label Hidden Beach. “I didn’t want to be under anybody’s thumb again or have to explain myself so much. That’s the best part of turning 40! I do not have to explain anything to anyone, and I don’t feel the need for approval. I am a lot of things, and to be confined in any way does not fit me. I don’t want to be in any boxes.”

As if.

The most cursory dig into Scott’s discography proves that she’s so original, she can’t be boxed in — musically or otherwise. That would be a silly, impossible notion. Go deep in side the musical crates, and it easy to understand why she is so revered, even beyond her unflinching and undeniable vocal prowess. People love Jill and are on a coveted Black America first-name basis with her because of the woman’s sheer willingness to go there and bring the listener along on the journey she takes in a single song; the shape-shifting and genre-bending, the passion, the theater and the drama. She has wiethin her an almost childlike sincerity and enthusiasm, whether she’s flashing that million-dollar smile or arching one shady brow. As she sings in “So Gone (What My Mind Says),” ‘This ain’t no movie, man. I’m a real woman…’

THIS FALL, SCOTT APPEARED in Lifetime TV’s highly anticipated Steel Magnolias, a remake of the 1989 classic film about the lives and friendship of six women in a small Louisiana town. The all-Black ensemble cast — directed by Kenny Leon– is in some ways an embarrassment of riches, featuring Alfre Woodard, Phylicia Rashad, Queen Latifah, Adepero Oduye and Condola Rashad, the latter whom Scott described as “ridiculously great. Not only does she live up to her lineage [as Phylicia’s daughter], she exceeds it.”

Scott plays Truvy, a a genial, self-proclaimed “glamour technician” whose home-based beauty salon doubles as the womens proverbial kitchen table. In order to authentically deliver iconic lines such as, “There’s no such thing as natural beauty,” Scott recalled the accents of her family members,m who hail from Rocky MOunt, N.C. And although she says she refused to watch the original film again — “I didn’t want to do a Dolly Parton portrayal of Truvy” — she may have inadvertently taken a page out of the country legend’s book: they both attended beauty school to prepare for their roles. “I went so that I could learn how to hold a comb, put some curls in, move the chair with my leg,” Scott explains. “The simple nuances of a hairdresser.”

Although she has a theater background and several film credits, Scott is aware that, as a musician-turned actor, she is still on proving ground. “People know me as a singer and a writer. I didn’t want anybody to think I was just going to take on this incredible, difficult, challenging craft and treat it like it’s something I’m just trying“, she says. “It’s real work, and that 4 a.m. call never feels good.”

SCOTT HAS FOUR “CAREER” muses: “Whoopi. Barbara. Bette. Diana,” she says of Goldberg, Streisand, Midler and Ross, respectively. “Renaissance women, all. They have no boundaries. Whoopi Goldberg has [won] every award there is: Tony, Grammy, Oscar, Emmy! What’cha want? She’s got ’em. and she earned them.”

Scott’s takeway? “Longevity. Longevity is key,” she says, deliberate in her repetition.

Typically, three to four years pass between Scott’s album releases, during which the singer just … lives. Enjoys her son. Pryas. Falls in love. In her current musical lull, Scott is writing a lot of plays, poetry, “a television show or two” and an opera she’s been mulling over for a decade. And though she has no idea what her fifth studio album may be, she suggests listeners should expect the unexpected. “I’ve done a great deal in the urban contemporary market,” Scott says. “it’s time for me to branch out. ‘Cause I sing jazz, I sing funk, I sing blues, I sing classical music, I sing gospel– I sing. So it’s time to go further. If I’m supposed to be singing in Portuguese, there’s what’s gonna happen.”

Scott will offer no apologies for this, of course. She will be too busy tending to her garden, stopping to smell her own damn flowers.
__________________________________
[Karen Good Marable
Ebony Magazine – October 2012]

ICE-T on The ART of RAP

In Communication, Griot, Movies, Music, Networking on July 25, 2012 at 8:54 am

Photo Flipbook Slideshow Maker

It’s still lunch time in the life of RAP MUSIC and while reading Ebony Magazine [July 2012], I came across a caption that read, “Where’s the beef? Finally, a documentary focusing on the process of Hip-Hop”.

Sounds interesting enough. It caught my attention – so I read on:

t would be a mistake to consider Ice-T’s first foray into the world of the documentary as just another hip-hop film. it’s different: It doesn’t care about beef’s or why so-and-so broke up or which rapper doesn’t like such-and-such. Rather, “Something From Nothing: The Art of Rap discusses the elements of hip-hop, how rhymes are made and how rhythms are born.

Musicians, hip-hop aficionados, and casual fans alike will appreciate Grandmaster Caz and Eminem’s description of how they make their rhymes and why they select the words they do. Rakim, Q-Tip, Immortal Technique, KRS-One and other granddaddies of rap explain their inventions. Here’s what Ice, now 54, had to say the latest endeavor, which is in theaters now.

“If your favorite rapper isn’t in it,
he ain’t in my address book.”

Why do this film?
Hip-hop started to dilute itself and [became] pop. I know I couldn’t get my point across in an interview or in a record I always wanted to direct movies. It was for me to interview my peers and break down what rap is to them and why it’s an art form that needs to be respected. It took two years to get everybody on film. Our only goal was to get it to Sundance. Now it’s coming out in theaters.

Although there are many big names in the movie, some are conspicuously absent, most notably, many rappers in today charts.
I didn’t interview anybody I didn’t know. All the people in the movie came out of my address book. This movie isn’t about seeing your favorite rappers; It’s more about seeing my favorite rappers. If your favorite rapper isn’t in it, he ain’t in my address book.

You’ve been in the game for a long time.
If you’re 18 now, then when I started on Law and Order: SUV, you were 5 years old. You don’t know about N.W.A. You don’t know about RUN-DMC. But there’s always that person who knows me from “Cop Killer” or gangsta rap, but it’s beautiful because that’s one of the reasons I’ll always be Ice-T. Even as an actor, I want people to know, I think that’s why Queen Latifah kept the Queen [even though she’s now primarily an actor]. I’m Ice-T till the wheels fall off.
[–ASG]


________________________________________________________________________________

I haven’t seen the documentary yet, though please believe I will within the next few days.
I’m a connoisseur of GOOD HEAD and for too long “sufficient rap” has been on-the-stay.

It used to speak to my mind and occasionally speak to my soul
and made me feel that WORDS were a pleasure to behold.

But nowadays, the radio’s constant rotating play
Is lack luster, a dream buster – yielding loads of verbal nays.

I eventually ditched the lyrics and opted for the instrumentals instead.
Then I realized I was missing the heart of proactive verbs in my head.

So I began to free style, constructing my own bars in Griot,
I’m Qui
and now that the documentary’s out – I’ll happily fare the reel ‘GO’.
Ice-T has the GOOD HEAD —>ya know?

What’s up with STACEY DASH these days

In Communication, Griot, Movies, Networking, Self Improvement, TV Shows on June 1, 2011 at 2:25 pm

Stacey Dash & Lisa Raye McCoy in SINGLE LADIES

From Clueless Teen to SINGLE LADY

Sixteen years after making a splash in the teen-com Clueless, STACEY DASH is finally getting her star turn — though she almost ended up on a reality show instead. — By Tim Stack

Another piece of INSIGHT into Black Sitcom TV…this time we focus on STACEY DASH and ‘what she’s doing’ these days. Did you catch the series premier of SINGLE LADIES? It was hot. It has all of the ingredients and insight as offered in SHOWTIMES “The Borgias”. lol! Tittilation in direct relation. Tim Stack authored the article in Entertainment Weekly [#1155 May 20,2011] to bring us up to date on STACEY DASH and where she is right now.

Enjoy the transcribed read.
QE loves Black Sitcom TV…

“Stacey Dash will probably always be best known for playing Alicia Silverstone’s BFF Dionne in the 1995 teen comedy Clueless. And that’s just fine by her. “It has been the best experience I have had in my entertainment career,” she says. “Nothing has topped it yet.”

While Silverstone went on to more big-screen roles in films like Batman & Robin, Dash stayed in character as Dionne for the TV adaptation of Clueless, which ran from 1996 to 1999. “I loved the character, and it was a good paycheck,” she laughs. “I mean, let’s be honest.”

The actress is equally blunt about how great her life is now. At 44, an age when most actresses struggle to find juicy parts, Dash has landed the starring role on VH1’s first hour long scripted series, “Single Ladies” (premiering May 30 at 9 p.m.). “When you enjoy what you do, you give the best that you can,” says the actress who jokes that she drinks unicorn blood to maintain her youthful glow. “I’m giving 150 percent.” Exec-produced by Queen Latifah, Ladies follows three best friends (Dash, LisaRaye McCoy, and Charity Shea) living in Atlanta and navigating complicated love lives. “To me, Stacey is a staple in our urban community,” says Latifah. “She crossed over long, long ago with Clueless. But she’s someone who’s always been beautiful and talented and special for women and men. The trice-divorced Dash was in talks to star on a reality show for VH1 about her dating life when she went in to audition for the role of Ladies Val, a former stylist thrusts back into the singles scene after her five-year relationship ends.

“I saw the first cut of the presentation tape of the reality show, says VH1 exec VP of original programming Jeff Olde. “At the same time, I got our talent team and our producers saying, ‘Stacey Dash came in and read today for Val and she blew us away’.” Dash whose post-Clueless career has included the film I Could Never Be Your Woman and NBC’s Celebrity Circus, decided the scripted drama was the way to go.

“The angels were on my side,”, Stacey says. I feel like I made the right [decision] doing this show.” And though she’s currently a single lady both on and off the screen, Dash hopes to find love again. Says the actress, “I believe in happily ever after”.”

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So THAT’S WHAT’S UP with Stacey Dash’s bum,
Clueless was a big hit and Single Ladies is another one!
May she find happiness, love and reap a paycheck of worthy sums.

I’m Qui
Enjoying
VH1, Jeff Olde & Latifahs scripted fun!

BLACK TV Sitcom Stuff Pt.2

In News on May 30, 2011 at 2:19 pm

Entertainment Weekly pressed a great read
that Qui Entertainment couldn’t refuse to transcribe & feed::

“The Rise & Fall and Rise Again of Black TV”

Entertainment Weekly — Part 2. Let’s Stay Together debuted in January to 4.4 million viewers, and Perry’s shows consistently hover near the 3 million mark. Even the competition has taken notice of The Game’s blockbuster debut: “Those numbers were wildly impressive to everybody,” says Michael Wright, TBS’ head of programming. “We’ve done really, really well with Tyler’s shows, but [The Game] surpassed even Tyler’s ratings. That premiere number should’ve made everyone think, “that’s a rating anyone would be happy to have.'”

So far, the broadcast networks have yet to act on the trend. While ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and The CW have made progress the past few seasons when it comes to casting diverse ensembles, the selection of shows in the pipeline for this fall once again lacks series with predominantly African American (or Latino or Asian) casts. “The world on television should look like the world I see when I walk outside my door,” says Grey’s Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes, developing of the fall season’s strongest contenders with a black lead, ABC’s Damage Control starring Kerry Washington as PR guru. And Queen Latifah, who starred for five seasons on Fox’s Living Single, sees African-American series as a way to represent a point of view sorely missing on television: “People live in bubbles and they perpetuate racism and classism. There’s still plenty of places they can go [on TV] that are as un-diverse as they could possibly be,” says the Ladies producer. “It’s just something that’s going to be a continuing fight, to try to keep making these things happen.”

Regardless of why the networks program for black audiences, viewers are clearly hungry for these shows: Not only are the few shoes doing well, reruns of long-cancelled series like My Wife and Kids and Everybody Hates Chris still top cable charts among African-American viewers. Says Charlie Jordan Brookins, senior vice president of programming for BET: “We’re not necessarily trying to say this is the new frontier. We'[re trying to super-serve an audience who has been underserved.” Adds Malcolm-Jamal Warner, “The black viewership is important. Black shows do make money. It seems like a no brainer.

[Entertainment Weekly Columnist: Jennifer Armstrong; Additional reporting by Archana Ram and Tim Stack]

How do you feel about BLACK TV?
I rather dig
those multi-ethnic gigs
that are reflective of you and me.

Who am I,
I am Qui
and I’m duly watching BLACK TV.
Oui! Oui!
Join Me.

BLACK TV Sitcom Stuff Pt. 1

In Griot, News, Self Improvement, TV Shows on May 30, 2011 at 1:03 pm

Recently I read a great article in Entertainment Weekly called:

“The Rise & Fall and Rise Again of Black TV”

Such a befitting title. Isn’t it? So good, I had to re-type it for peeps that don’t receive the monthly magazine in print. READING is fundamental and KNOWLEDGE is golden::

Entertainment Weekly — Two years ago broadcast TV officially got out of the African-American sitcom business. The CW canceled the long-running Girlfriends in 2008, and the following year it yanked both Everybody Hates Chris and The Girlfriends spin off, The Game— also known as the last two successful black-eccentric shows on network television. ••►But today something is saving black TV from becoming as outmoded as Bill Cosby’s acrylic sweaters: basic cable, where scripted programming is experiencing explosive growth. In January, BET revived The Game to a record-breaking 7.7 million viewers–which is three times the audience it got on The CW and, in fact, twice the size of anything on the teen-skewing network now. (Sorry Gossip Girl.) The success of The Game and BET’s Queen Latifah produced romantic comedy Let’s Stay Together, which also premiered in January, has spurred the network to develop Reed Between the Lines, a new fall sitcom starring Girlfriends Tracy Ellis Ross and The Cosby’s Show’s Malcolm-Jamal Warner. Meanwhile, VH1 has joined up with Queen Latifah, who will be exec-producing its new dramedy Single Ladies (debuting in May 30), starring Clueless’ Stacy Dash.

In reality, this new generation of African-American-focused scripted TV can be traced to TBS’ success in 2007 when it acquired House of Payne from the proven brand of Tyler Perry. (Some 222 episodes later, the network recently announced it would be ending Payne but staying in the Perry business with For Better or Worse, an adaptation of his film Why Did I Get Married?) The reason for the big ratings and latest development rush is simple: pent-up demand. “I’ve had plenty of people say to me that it’s great to see something on TV that represents them”, says Jacque Edmonds-Cofer, exec producer of Let’s Stay Together”. “It’s also important for people to see that every African American woman is not a Real Housewife”. Adds VH1’s exec VP of original programming, Jeff Olde, “I think our shows should reflect the country we’re living in– go, Barack and Michelle! We’re thrilled that we have a large number of African-American women who watch us, and quite frankly, we’re always looking for new stories to tell.

Both BET and VH1 set their programming in response to direct viewer demands. BET first ran The Game in reruns, which sparked an onslaught of fans begging for the network to revive the show. VH1 initially shot Single Ladies as a TV movie, but market testing on the project garnered a “crazy ridiculous response,” Olde says. “[The marketers] SAID, ‘Not only do they want you to make this a series but the audience will actually be mad at you if they don’t see where these characters go next’.”

The ratings for the black-centric shows that have already premiered bear this out.

This concludes Part 1.and wouldn’t you know,
you don’t want to miss the conclusion — because it’s good to go…